mollys journey

Molly was born 16 weeks premature at Southmead Hospital Bristol and was immediately transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. She weighed 669 grams and measured 20cm in length. Initially Molly was on life support, a venous catheter was inserted into the vein in her umbilical cord administering vital nutrition and medication. At 5 days old Molly was put on different breathing apparatus called CPAP, a small mask covering her nose. Lines were removed from her tummy and a special very fine plastic tube known as a long line was inserted into a vein in her arm. Medication, nutrition and blood transfusions were given this way for several weeks . She had a feeding tube placed up her nose and would receive small amounts of breast milk every two hours. During these critical weeks Molly needed to grow and develop as she would have if she was still in the womb. On 26th October Molly moved from ICU to the high dependency unit. She was now able to regulate her own body temperature and was placed in an open top cot. We were now able to handle Molly more frequently and for longer periods of time. She stayed here for a further 4 weeks before being transported by a specialised team to Musgrove. Molly moved from HDU into the low dependency unit and was now classed as stable only returning to ICU for blood transfusions which were essential to replenish certain blood cells which she was currently unable to make at sufficient levels by herself. In LDU she experienced her first bath, music and her first trip outside in a pram. On 1st February Molly was discharged from hospital. She was re admitted fairly quickly due to feeding and breathing difficulties but after a short stay was soon home again. Molly is currently on oxygen at home but is beginning to wean off for several hours a day and we are hoping towards the end of the year she may be off of it altogether.

FROM BUMP TO BABY IN INTENSIVE CARE

The intensive care unit is made up of various pieces of equipment, dim lighting, alarms sounding, clinical smells and people. People who are just doing their job but the job that they do is absolutely incredible. They are responsible for looking after babies who are critically sick. Babies that have had problems at birth or babies that have been born too early. Every member of the intensive care team that we met became a part of our journey whether they wanted to or not. They were involved now and every person in every job role was important and gave support in some way to keeping our daughter safe, cared for, pain free and as well as she possibly could be. They gave support to George and I as parents, a quick hug from Mandy on security when popping out for a five minute breather if Molly was having a bad day. Lorna popping her head round the door checking on her ‘little mates’. Lisa and Carley talking of their love for rabbits, Michelle with her epic tales of cycling to and from work. Ana and Pilar attempting to teach me Spanish and Kirsty wittering on about her passion for dinosaurs. All these people and many more helped to take us away just for a few minutes from the scary situation we were facing. The level of professionalism, the calm and caring attitudes, the swiftness of care received by the babies is second to none and we along with many other parents will never be able to thank the Southmead and Musgrove team enough for all they have done

MOLLY WAS IN HOSPITAL FOR 143 DAYS
IN SEPTEMBER 2017 MOLLY TRAVELLED 143 MILES REPRESENTING EACH DAY SHE WAS IN HOSPITAL. THE MONEY RAISED WAS DONATED TO THE SOUTHMEAD AND MUSGROVE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNITS
MOLLYS MILES 2017 RAISED AN INCREDIBLE £12,373!!!
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